Tuesday

Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt






The recent re-taking of Tahrir Square by protesters has prompted a new rash of graffiti in Cairo. More and more, they explicitly denounce the rule of SCAF, the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces.

A glimpse of the uprising in Egypt.


Eyes closed: Before the revolution, political expression in Egypt was stifled…

Bandaged man: but the anger broke through after the example of the Tunisian revolution of January...

Chess board: Notice that the king has been toppled in this game of chess

The Statue of Liberty: wears a full veil. Underneath is written, “You’re not free!”—a quote taken from a Salafi song, advising women that they must remain submissive

Fist: There are plenty of fists of defiance; this one is inscribed with a crescent and cross, the symbol of religious unity that was one of the features of Tahrir Square, when Coptic priests and Muslim Imams held hands and demonstrated together


As activists have now settled into Tahrir for a long-term sit-in, they decry the “couch party” of people who prefer to sit at home and complain about the ongoing disruption. Was heartening to see many first timers taking to the streets to show solidarity with the cause of Freedom

May Peace return to Egypt soon

5 comments:

melinda said...

Excellent art! The anger palpable:(

Jim said...

Hey M! Thx for sharing. A huge intl concern, whats happening there, the atrocities...

RavneetSingh said...

The chess board graffiti is stunning. Speaks volumes. How are things in Egypt now?

Shweta said...

Its a pity we hear only murmurs of whats going on in that part of the world. Our media is way too focused on toppling the current govt, and sensationalizing non existent news, when the real news is sitting a few steps from our home!

Mee said...

Just today, tanks entered Cairo’s Tahrir Square and started firing in the air, to clear the square — where a sit-in has been going on since July 8 to protest the slow pace of reform in Egypt — of the remaining activists. Egyptian state television showed footage of people taking down tents and at least a dozen tanks in the square; a few hundred people are said to remain in Tahrir. According to Al Jazeera, local shopkeepers said that the protesters were “interfering with their businesses”; when protesters reportedly refused to leave, the army and riot police moved in. Some protesters threw rocks and stones and suffered injuries and some were arrested.

Some friends called and said, that plainclothes policemen tore down the tents with sticks and shredded the fabric. They also prevented people from taking photographs of the expulsion and took the cameras and cell phones of some who had taken pictures; activists are being prevented from reentering the Square. It seems like a violent retaking of Tahrir Square by Egypt’s military...